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OrangeMohawk

.NET
Compiling Injection Assembly In Visual Studio

9 posts in this topic

Well, since alot of people have been asking about compiling the Injection branch of Assembly lately, I figured I'd make a tutorial to help them out. Of course, you can apply this to any source code you need to, but I'll be using Injection Assembly in the tutorial.

 

What you'll need

  • A source code - Injection Assembly (on the right side of the page, click Download ZIP)
  • Something to extract the contents of the ZIP file (I think that Windows can do this automatically, but I use WinRAR.) 7-Zip should suffice if you need something free (found through a quick search on Google)
  • Visual Studio 2012 or above. I believe Express should work fine as a free alternative to the full software, however, I will be using VS Ultimate 2012 in this tutorial. Have this installed before following the tutorial.
  • xdevkit.dll from the Xbox 360 SDK. I won't be posting any links since it is warez. Google can help you out here.
  • Courtesy of AMD: You might need the Expression Blend 4 SDK in order to compile it if you don't already have it.

Step 1: Extracting the ZIP file

Of course, the first thing you'll need to do is extract the contents of the ZIP file you downloaded from GitHub. With WinRAR (and I'm sure it's similar with other extractors), right click on the ZIP file and choose "Extract Here". When it's done extracting, you should see a folder named "Assembly-injection". Open it, then open the "src" folder inside. Inside, you should see a file called "Assembly.sln". That is our solution file, which contains the structure of the program's project. Now, assuming you have Visual Studio installed, you can double click on that to open the file in VS.

 

Step 2: Adding the xdevkit.dll Reference

Upon opening the file, you should see something like this:

9684701406_e98d0db93d_o.png

 

Now, if you've never opened Visual Studio before, you're probably clueless what's going on here, like I was the first time I opened it. The most important thing to know is the Solution Explorer on the left side (it might be on the right, depending on the version of VS you're using). Scroll down to the bottom of the solution explorer, until you find "XBDMCommunicator". If it's not already, expand it to see its contents. Right click on "References", and select "Add Reference..."

9684782348_962ce70e34_o.png

 

Now, click on "Browse...", navigate to the location of your xdevkit.dll, select it, and click "Add". You should see something like this now:

9684799456_bb2d3b8760_o.png

 

Click "OK", and we can move on to the next step.

 

Step 3: Compiling

Click the dropdown box that says "Debug" underneath the "TEST" menu at the top; and change it to "Release". Now, all we have left to do is compile our code. On the top menu, under "BUILD", click "Build Solution".

9681577081_737941dbde_o.png

 

Upon clicking this, you should see the Output box come to life:

9684829772_bdfa8ac5de_o.png

 

You'll know it's done when at the bottom of the output box, you see something like this:

========== Build: 8 succeeded, 0 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

Step 4: Where the Hell is my Program!?

Good question! Assuming you set the build mode to Release, open back up the "Assembly-injection" folder you started with. Then open "src", then "Assembly", then "bin", and finally "Release". So in not so many words, you can find it in Assembly-injection\src\Assembly\bin\Release. You can copy this folder over to your Program Files folder, and rename it if you wish to do so. But, running Assembly.exe from this folder will start the program for you.

 

It should be noted that the plugins included with this version of Assembly are outdated. You can find the most up to date plugins here.

 

If you followed this correctly, you should have a working version of Injection Assembly, just like you always dreamed of. Yay!

 

As always, if you've got any questions, comments, etc. Don't hesitate to post or send me a PM!

 

Thanks

Microsoft for the tools to create and build software.

The Assembly team for an awesome program.

AMD for fixing problems before they happen

WaeV, weighta, Joshua1998 and 3 others like this

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Great tutorial! Couple things I want to add:

  1. You might need the Expression Blend 4 SDK in order to compile it if you don't already have it.
  2. I'd actually recommend compiling in Release mode instead of in Debug mode. If an exception occurs while in Debug mode, you'll lose all your unsaved work because Assembly won't show an error dialog thinking VS will be there to handle it. To change to Release mode, find the dropdown near the top of VS that says "Debug" in it and change it to say "Release". Likewise, your compiled .exe will be in a folder named "Release" instead of "Debug".
OrangeMohawk likes this

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Great tutorial! Couple things I want to add:

  1. You might need the Expression Blend 4 SDK in order to compile it if you don't already have it.
  2. I'd actually recommend compiling in Release mode instead of in Debug mode. If an exception occurs while in Debug mode, you'll lose all your unsaved work because Assembly won't show an error dialog thinking VS will be there to handle it. To change to Release mode, find the dropdown near the top of VS that says "Debug" in it and change it to say "Release". Likewise, your compiled .exe will be in a folder named "Release" instead of "Debug".

 

Thanks  :smile: Added those to OP. Glad you were looking out, cause this stuff is still somewhat confusing to me. I was just hoping to help everybody get their hands on non-release versions.

 

Edit: ahhh so that's why it kept freezing on me instead of giving an exception...

Edited by OrangeMohawk

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People should read the git's wiki for piece of mind.

 

(Like anything exists there, aside from how to compile)

Yeah, basically what I posted here, in simpler form. But this should help people who've never used Visual Studio before

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ive gotten decent at it im attempting to add model into forge world idk how to add useable vehicles like zedd did nor do i know how to add grunts at are playable :/ 

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Just FYI, I've merged the master branch into the injection branch. This means that any changes or bugfixes that have been made to the main branch of the program since the injection branch was created are now available in the injection branch. I haven't tested it thoroughly, but everything should work. Re-download the source (or do a Pull if you're actually using git) to get the changes.

Akarias, Wil and OrangeMohawk like this

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